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20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
and challenges you confront. in this job, i have tried to be as accessible as i can to the pentagon press corps to engage regularly with reporters and to encourage other senior officials in the department to do the same. it is an especially important time to communicate our vision and our priorities as a department. as i have said time and time again over this past year, i believe that we are at a strategic turning point. after more than a decade of war, the longest extended period of conflict in the history of the united states. at the beginning of 2012, president obama and the military and civilian leaders of the department came together to publicly release a new defense strategy. it was designed to help the military affectively navigate this turning point and prepare for the future. under that strategy, our goal was to reshape the force of the 21st century. to try to meet the new security challenges that we are confronted in this world and try to help the country at the same time reduce the deficits which are confronting. we were handed a number and the budget control act to reduce the defen
the holiday in afghanistan. more on them coming up. plus, there is no word from the pentagon that the u.s. military will soon be sending teams to africa. also later, prayers for peace in syria. the latest round of bloody bombings killing innocent men, women and children. all they were doing waiting in line for food. [ male announcer ] when was the last time something made your jaw drop? campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. >> jamie: troops in afghanistan are celebrating christmas with a special dinner and candlelight mass. couple soldiers admitted the difficulty of spending the holiday in the war zone but said they are making the best of it. >> like everyone else, i am missing the o
the comfort of the north lawn reporting on the pentagon and the white house and the troops upsurge numbers and how this became a project that's really became attached to. lou: you focus on this particular battle, you talk with nearly 225 individuals. how long did that take? >> they range from generals, private, widows, couple insurgents, one of whom i interviewed by skype. it was a big project that every time i thought i wasev done, tak to smitty, i mean ultimately i just had to stop because there was never going to be a time where i had talked to everybody. lou: you are pursuing one of the toughest explanations, that is how those men can be caught ate that outpost and be the target to be outnumbered so outrageously and incapable of being protected. this is how it started. how is in hospi in the hospitaly newborn son, jack. he was a day-old, out of the corner of my eye i saw the story about the outpost and never heard of combat outpost. coverage along the lines of what would anybody put outpost there? it became a mystery that i needed to solve. why woultd we put our troops in such a vulner
the wall street journal, or the pentagon indicated they wanted to maintain 6000 to 15th thousand u.s. troops following 2014. that is the issue under discussion now. there's approximately around 340 0,000 afghan security forces in place, including the police. the pentagon recently indicated i don't believe there was a major unit capable of operating independently from nato support. there was some manipulation of the metrics they were using where the things appear to be making more progress than perhaps they were. that came out in a white paper. what will be the long term success or failure of the afghan national security forces is yet to be determined. they need about $4.1 billion a year to continue at that level, which is more than the entire government revenues in afghanistan. so it's gone to take a long-term commitment of foreign powers to maintain that size of armed forces. the afghans have proven that they are excellent fighters. the question is will they be excellent soldiers for the government of afghanistan? host: one other question, how stable do you think the karzai govern
of the show and they just kind of, we got calls from people from the pentagon and from politicians. both shows were done and conceived without cooperation and without any purported. connection to how they actually run. it was never part of the promises. i've attempted some shows that have not seen the light of day with cooperation of government agencies. i worked for a long time on a show with the f.b.i. and also with nasa, negotiate of which probably not unco--- probably not coins dently came to fruition. but these shows "homeland" -- "24" made up it's own organization c.. the u. to avoid it and with "homeland" it was a step towards reality so it does elude to the cia. but -- >> our relationship with the military was interesting because obviously these agencies want to keep arm's length. and once they became fans -- i think it was that simple, they just enjoyed it and felt this is portraying when we did portray a general or soldier, the military became cooperative. so we had a pentagon lie ace son. it got to the point we said we need a couple of f-16s they said sure. it got great. a lot of pr
at the pentagon. barbara, there's outrage from a lot of folks about this. the nra came out pretty strong about arming the schools. is there any kind of middle ground here from those who say, look, we want to stop gun violence, but there has to be a better way to protect the children? >> the nra didn't double down on what it wants, which is a focus on armed security personnel in schools. what other people say, suzanne, is, look, that's not a new idea. school districts have grappled with security for years, and some have gone this way. even in the 1999 terrible massacre at columbine high school in colorado, there was an armed security person on the school grounds at that time. it helped a little bit, but obviously, not able to stop what happened there. the people who want to see another way to go, many in congress are talking about a package of solutions. some new measures on gun control. some new measures on high-powered magazines. taking another look the at school safety. taking a look at how this country deals with with those who are mentally ill. this package of solutions they say that the p
to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before he became secretary of state. whener's paper, which are i read a few years ago, i thought it was the most remarkable document ever to emerge from washington in the last few years. looking at the emerging eco
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)